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  • Desert Globemallow

    Desert Globemallow Scientific Name: Sphaeralcea ambigua Type: Herbaceous Plant Habitat: Desert Range: Native to parts of Southern California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona Status: No listed status This species is NATIVE to the Truckee Meadows. Out of gallery Identification: This drought-tolerant shrub grows to be 1 to 3 feet in height and prefers full sun. It grows rapidly and produces small orange flowers in the early spring and throughout the summer - depending on rainfall. Desert globemallow grows in multiple stems and has small green leaves which can be identified by their three lobes and scalloped edges. This plant is a favorite among bees and other pollinating insects which rely on their flowers in the desert landscapes of the Southwestern United States. Fast Facts: Marshmallows are named after the plants they are derived from - mallows! We have this family to thank for the best summer treat! Despite its small size, this species produces a large number of flowers which the pollinators in the southwest are thankful for! The many flowers mean a steady source of pollen and nectar - you may have even tasted some desert globemallow in local honey! This plant has been recognized by ecologists as a species responsible for attracting a large number of native bee species and the common skipper butterfly. Consider planting it near your vegetable garden to increase pollinators in the area and help your fruits, herbs, and veggies flourish! This plant only propagates from seed and thrives in even the driest soil! It reseeds itself so once planted it is likely little ones will pop up nearby. After a fire, this is one of the first native species to return, ultimately preventing the spread of invasive species that prefer to take over vulnerable natural spaces. This plant has been spotted in Arches National Park in Utah - but here in the Truckee Meadows you can spot it at Tom Cooke Trail! It is sometimes referred to as apricot mallow due to its flowers being a similar color to apricots! Sources: Back to Plants & Fungi https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=SPAM2 https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=spam2 https://www.westernnativeseed.com/plant%20guides/sphambpg.pdf Image: BLM Nevada, https://www.flickr.com/photos/55893585@N08/33577890431 , license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ , cropped from original. Contributor(s): Bridget Mulkerin (research & content) Alex Shahbazi (edits & page design) Last Updated: June 16, 2021, 11:06:40 PM

  • Stinging Nettle

    Stinging Nettle Scientific Name: Urtica dioica Type: Herbaceous Plant Habitat: Wet and shady places Range: Europe, North America, North Africa, and Asia Status: Least Concern (IUCN Red List) This species is NON-NATIVE to the Truckee Meadows. Out of gallery Identification: Stinging nettles have dark green, opposite, toothed and pointed leaves. Their stems can grow from 2 to 5 feet high. Up close, you can see the thin, stinging hairs (“trichomes”) covering the stem and undersides of the leaves. Fast Facts: The trichomes (hairs) of stinging nettle contain formic acid, acetylcholine, serotonin, and histamine, which can cause swelling along with mild to intense burning/stinging sensation. This reaction can last several hours, but it is not known to cause serious harm. The rash can be treated with cold compresses and topical antihistamine. The sting from the nettle plant has actually been used medically to treat arthritis, bursitis, and even things such as stimulating hair growth and ED! An individual plant will produce either male or female flowers. Stinging nettle is edible: it can be made into a tea, brewed into a beer, or used like spinach or other leafy greens. It must be cooked first, though, to prevent stinging. In the UK, they have raw nettle eating competitions to see who is the toughest and can tolerate eating the most with the sting. Stinging nettle is high in many vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and proteins. Making it into a tea or cooking the leaves like greens are ways to get these many benefits. You can also make nettle pesto for a healthy and tasty treat! Sources: Back to Plants & Fungi Encyclopaedia Britannica: Stinging Nettle Wild Edible: Stinging Nettles Daily Mail: “Why DO stinging nettles hurt so much?” American Botanical Council: “Food as Medicine: Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica, Urticaceae)” “Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner’s Guide” by Rosemary Gladstar Matador Network: “This stinging nettle eating competition is England’s strangest food tradition” Contributor(s): Jill Katz (research & content) Alex Shahbazi (edits & page design) Last Updated: June 15, 2021, 8:22:22 PM

  • Northern Flicker

    Northern Flicker Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus Type: Bird Habitat: Open woodlands, city parks, and western mountains Range: Common through North America Status: Least Concern (IUCN Red List) This species is NATIVE to the Truckee Meadows. Out of gallery Identification: Northern flickers are members of the woodpecker family, and can often be found drumming on tree limbs. Flickers are large (about 12 inches) brown birds with a black bib and spots or scalloped black feathers on their chest and a bright white rump. The feather shafts are very bright and can be seen in flight. While the red-shafted flicker is more common in the west, and the yellow-shafted flicker is more common in the east, they are not separate species and instead both northern flicker subspecies. Fast Facts: While flickers are commonly seen in trees, they spend a great deal of time on the ground eating insects. Flickers eat ants more often than most other US birds. Flickers will scratch and dig on the ground (or in cow patties) for insects. They have a tongue that can dart out 2 inches past their bill! And they use their long, barbed tongue to slurp up ants and other insects. In the winter they will eat berries, sunflower seeds and thistle. Drumming is not only a way to pick bugs off of bark, but it is also a form of communication, and that is why they will also drum on metal. While northern flickers are listed as Least Concern, the lowest level on the IUCN Red List, it should be noted that their populations have declined by 49% from 1966-2012. While there is some variation in location between the red-shafted and the yellow-shafted flickers (both subspecies), they can be found from as far north as Alaska, south to Central America, and from the pacific west coast of California to as far to the east as Cuba. Flickers can be found in any of the Truckee Meadows' parks where there is a mixture of trees and open areas for foraging. Sources: Back to All Animals National Geographic, Northern Flicker, 2021, https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/birds/facts/northern-flicker . Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Northern Flicker, 2021, https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/ . National Audubon Society, Northern Flicker, 2021, https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/northern-flicker . IUCN Red List, Colaptes auratus , 2016, https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22726404/94921271 . Contributor(s): Regina Hockett (research & content) Alex Shahbazi (edits & page design) Last Updated: May 11, 2021, 10:04:34 PM

  • Membership Coordinator VISTA

    Membership Coordinator VISTA Summary Are you interested in gaining professional experience, empowering communities, and making a lasting difference? Join the Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation team through AmeriCorps VISTA! The Membership Coordinator VISTA will focus on membership recruitment and retention, and will facilitate all member communications and events to help expand Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation, a growing nonprofit in Reno, Nevada. Position Description The Membership Coordinator VISTA will be an essential member of the team for this growing non-profit organization. Under the guidance of the Development Director, this person will manage membership tracking, communications, and reports using the donor database eTapestry. This person will also improve member appreciation methods, expand the major donor and planned donor giving programs, coordinate fundraising appeals, and help in the planning and implementation of member events. Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation is a private nonprofit that was incorporated in 2012 and received its 501(c)(3) determination in 2013. The Parks Foundation protects and enhances our communities' livability through public engagement, education, and the sustainability of our parks, open spaces, and trails. Current programs focus on improving community health and wellness and developing people’s appreciation for the natural and cultural history found in local parks. A special emphasis is placed on increasing access to free programming for low income community members in order to improve education and health outcomes for people living in poverty. Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. Our team represents a variety of backgrounds, perspectives, and abilities, and we strive to act with mutual respect, integrity, and care. We seek candidates whose personal and/or professional experiences have prepared them to share in our commitment to fostering connections and inclusion with diverse people both within our office and in the outdoors. AmeriCorps VISTA Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation’s Community Engagement Coordinator VISTA is funded by the Corporations for National and Community Service and will serve within the AmeriCorps VISTA program. AmeriCorps VISTA is the national service program designed specifically to fight poverty. Each VISTA member makes a year-long, full-time commitment to serve on a specific project at a nonprofit organization or public agency. To learn more about the AmeriCorps programs visit americorps.gov . Timeline for Service: August 30, 2021 - August 29, 2022 Primary Responsibilities Improve and maintain the database to track member donations; Improve protocols for initial contact, cultivation, and stewardship of donors; Organize Parks Foundation member-only events; Research and implement donor and fundraising appeal best practices; Coordinate quarterly fundraising appeals and assist with additional mailings; Assist with developing community partnerships to support the Parks Foundation; Continue to develop fundraising strategies and materials to support Parks Foundation operations; Assist with Parks Foundation events and programs. Qualifications Ability to pass a background check; Bachelor's degree and/or experience in fundraising, grant writing, and/or networking; Passionate commitment to Parks Foundation's mission and vision; Exceptional writing skills; Experience in and willingness to solicit for and acquire donations; Strong communication skills; Strong organizational skills; High degree of initiative and spirit of service; Preferred: Experience in membership programs and databases; Preferred: Reading, writing, and speaking competency in Spanish language. Compensation and Benefits In return for their service, AmeriCorps VISTA members receive a living allowance of approximately $13,400. Upon completion of service, choice of Segal AmeriCorps Education Award of approximately $6,000 or post-service stipend of $1,800. A relocation settling-in allowance of no less than $750 if you are moving more than 50 miles, and travel allowance based on mileage may also apply. Health benefits during service. Child care assistance (if applicable). Qualified student loan deferment or forbearance. Non-competitive eligibility for qualified government jobs the first year after completing service. Professional development through monthly training, skills learned in service, and experience in a nonprofit environment. Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation offers flex time, mileage reimbursement for service-related travel, a casual dress code, and a fun office environment! To apply: Applications are accepted by emailing a cover letter and resume to Sara Monks at saramonks@tmparksfoundation.org . Visit the TMPF website www.tmparksfoundation.org or email/call Sara at 775.410.1702 for more information. Back To All Jobs

  • Pleasant Valley Park

    405 Surrey Dr, Reno, NV 89521 Pleasant Valley Park Park Description: Pleasant Valley Park is a 6-acre Washoe County park without restrooms. Park Amenities: Playground, multi-purpose field, picnic area, tables/benches. Park Highlights 1/1 Park History Click the image to read each topic's full text! Settlers in Pleasant Valley The history of this area goes back to the days before Nevada was a state. With its proximity to the gold rush in California and the Comstock Lode in Virginia City, the entire Washoe Valley was one of the earliest settlements in the state. During the late 1800s, the valley was home to many quartz mills. Lumber was harvested in the mountains and brought down to the valley in flumes, then transported to the Comstock mines. The valley was also home to many ranches, raising cattle and growing crops to supply the growing population. One of the first European settlers in Pleasant Valley was George Smith. Smith and his family were Mormons from the Utah Territory who came to the area around 1858 and settled on 160-acres of land. Smith named the area Pleasant Valley. The family farmed the land with alfalfa, wheat and barley for many years. As one visitor reported, “Looking around in Pleasant Valley are waving grass and green orchards and happy homes with families named Smith.” Prior to the influx of European settlers to Nevada, this area was home to many Native American groups including the Northern Paiute, the Washoe, and the Shoshone. To learn more about these three tribes today, visit the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony website, http://www.rsic.org/. Image: 1850 Wagon Train in Mountains. Source: NDOT. Ranching in Pleasant Valley Farms and ranches were important to Pleasant Valley. One old timer described his impression of Pleasant Valley, “Passing through a rugged canyon at the north end of the [Washoe] valley, cutting a channel through a low range of hills, Pleasant Valley is entered, containing an area of a thousand acres of fertile and well-watered lands. Here are several good farms as the same character as those in the [Washoe] valley below.” The farmers got water for their crops from Washoe Lake and from the creeks coming off of Mt. Rose. Water was such an important commodity. One newspaper observed, “This is the lake which the Comstock papers thought of no value and recommended its drainage. The man or set of men, who attempt to drain Washoe Lake, will have more injunctions and lawsuits on his hands than generally sought by the law abiding citizens.” Image: The Winters Ranch House in nearby Washoe Valley from the 1860s. Source: Kelly O’Keefe, The Western Nevada Historic Photo Collection. The V&T Railroad In 1872, the Virginia and Truckee Railroad (V&TRR) was extended from Carson City to Reno and came through Pleasant Valley with a stop at Smith’s place, plus a side track to the Stevenson and Douglas mill. The side track allowed machinery to be installed at a mill, including five stamps. The newspapers in the late 1800s have numerous mentions of accidents or near accidents involving livestock and wagons crossing the train tracks. The V&TRR declined in the late 1920s and by 1950, it stopped running and the tracks were removed. Image: The V&T Railroad: In 1872, the Virginia and Truckee Railroad (V&TRR) was extended from Carson City to Reno and came through Pleasant Valley with a stop at Smith’s place, plus a side track to the Stevenson and Douglas mill. The side track allowed machinery to be installed at a mill, including five stamps. The newspapers in the late 1800s have numerous mentions of accidents or near accidents involving livestock and wagons crossing the train tracks. The V&TRR declined in the late 1920s and by 1950, it stopped running and the tracks were removed. Image: Ticket for the V&T Railroad. Source: Wikipedia Commons Mining in Pleasant Valley Pleasant Valley was not extensively investigated during the height of the silver rush, but there was some activity over the years. In 1876, miners from Virginia City decided to try a quicksilver mine and in 1885 several prospectors came to try their luck because there were rumors that gold had been found in a ravine coming off the mountain some twenty years prior. Rancher George S. Smith owned the Smith Mine and in 1887 found gold ore that was assayed between $70 and $80 per ton. The mine had been quiet for a number of years when in 1906, the Rocky Hill Company took a deeper interest in the mine. The company had a cyanide plant and a mill equipped with ten stamps. Eventually in 1914, the mortgages for Rocky Hill Mining Company were foreclosed by Washoe County Bank; they said the property contained low-grade gold. Image: Close up image of galena. Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com. Relocation of the Highway After the Virginia and Truckee Railroad was removed, the Reno-Carson highway brought people through Pleasant Valley—people going back and forth between Reno and Carson City. As early as 1959 there was interest in moving the highway to a better, safer location. Many years later in August of 2012, the new 8.5-mile stretch of Interstate 580 was opened. The Galena Creek Bridge, visible from Pleasant Valley Park, took five years to build and cost about $555 million because of challenges due to geologic conditions, severe winter conditions, concerns over the heavy winds in the area, cracks found on the bridge before it opened, and even a 2012 wildfire in Pleasant Valley that jumped the highway. At 300-feet high, 1700-feet long, and with a 700-foot supporting arch, it was the largest cathedral arch bridge in the world as of 2012. Image: Galena Creek Bridge moonset. Source: NDOT. Subdivisions and the Park Arrive The Pleasant Valley Rancho residential homes development began in 1960. This subdivision was built on the old Smith ranch and consisted of 145 acres that were divided into home sites of 1 and 2-acre parcels. The western-styled homes were conceived by an award-winning designer to appeal to families with horses and those who enjoy country living. The models were open to the public in 1961. The Pleasant Valley Park opened in 2002 at a cost of $239,000. The park offers spectacular views of the Carson Range, including Slide Mountain. The Galena Creek Bridge on Highway 580 and Ormat Steamboat Geothermal Power Plant are also visible from the park, and all these have interesting stories of their own. Out of gallery Get Involved! Donate: Make a donation to support the Parks Project or your favorite Parks Foundation program, project, or wherever its needed! Click here to donate today. Volunteer: Support our parks by volunteering with the Parks Foundation! Attend a volunteer event or choose an ongoing role. Click here to explore opportunities. iNaturalist : Out in our parks or open spaces? Try cataloguing the biodiversity around you with iNaturalist! All it takes is downloading the iNaturalist app onto your phone to get started. ​ Curious what's been seen in this park? Click the link below to see what species other have spotted! Pleasant Valley Park on iNaturalist Contact: Have a question about our parks or the Parks Project? Email us at parksproject@tmparksfoundation.org ! Want To Learn More? References & Further Info: Washoe County Parks and Open Space - Pleasant Valley Park Newspapers.com: Reno Gazette-Journal Newspapers.com: Nevada State Journal Contributor(s): Jill Richardson (history) Haley McGuire Alex Shahbazi Last Updated: April 20, 2021, 4:31:32 AM Back to All Parks Biodiversity

  • Siberian Elm

    Siberian Elm Scientific Name: Ulmus pumila Type: Tree Habitat: Forests, deserts, and a variety of human-made areas Range: Native to East and Central Asia; cultivated or invasive worldwide Status: Least Concern (IUCN Red List) This species is INVASIVE to the Truckee Meadows. Fora da galeria Identification: Siberian elms are deciduous trees that usually grow between 50 and 70 feet tall. Their oblong leaves are between 1 and 3 inches long and they have green flowers and light gray-brown bark. The fruit of Siberian elms ripen in April and May. Fast Facts: Siberian elms are native to eastern and central Asia. In the United States, Siberian elms are an invasive species which can tolerate poor soil conditions, drought, extreme cold, and high salinity. These trees have high germination rates and grow rapidly. They are resistant to Dutch elm disease and are known to crossbreed with native slippery elms. For these reasons, it is illegal to plant in the city of Reno. Siberian elm trees have many edible parts. Their unripened seeds are edible and their inner bark can be dried and ground to a powder to thicken soup. Beyond that, both sauce and wine have been made out of their immature fruit. Sources: Back to Plants & Fungi Morton Arboretum, Siberian elm (not recommended), 2021, https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/siberian-elm-not-recommended USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, 2006, https://plants.usda.gov/factsheet/pdf/fs_ulpu.pdf North Dakota State University, Siberian Elm, 2021, https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/trees/handbook/th-3-117.pdf United States Department of Agriculture, Field Guide for Managing Siberian Elm in the Southwest, 2014, https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5410128.pdf IUCN Red List, Siberian Elm, 2018, https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/61967372/61967374 Image: Melburnian, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ulmus_pumila_leaves.jpg , license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en , cropped from original. Contributor(s): Bridget Mulkerin (research & content) Alex Shahbazi (edits & page design) Last Updated: May 12, 2021, 10:45:03 PM

  • Betsy Caughlin Donnelly Park

    3295 Mayberry Dr, Reno, NV 89509 Betsy Caughlin Donnelly Park Park Description: Betsy Caughlin Donnelly Park is a 30-acre Washoe County park without restrooms. The park features views of the Truckee Meadows and the Sierra Nevada mountains and is home to Reno Food System's Park Farm. Park Amenities: Walking trails, and benches. Park Highlights 1/1 Park History Click the image to read each topic's full text! The Park As cars speed along on South McCarran Boulevard, passengers may notice the 30-acre Betsy Caughlin Donnelly Park which bears the name and 150-year history of a pioneer ranching family of Reno, the Caughlins. Opened in 1993, the park with its beautiful trees, walking path and benches, is located on land where cattle and sheep once grazed. The Caughlin family owned the land from 1874 operated it as a ranch. At one point, the ranch totaled over 6,000 acres. Betsy Caughlin Donnelly donated the land in 1990 to be used by the public. But she stipulated that the park have no bright lights, big buildings, or noisy ball fields. She wanted local kids to be able to watch cows doing their thing in the pasture next to the park and the original ranch house, just like she did when she was growing up. The County leases that land out in the summer for cows to graze that pasture. Mrs. Donnelly received the Good Neighbors Award in 1995 for her contribution of the land. Image: Jill Richardson. Betsy Caughlin Donnelly The daughter of William Henry Caughlin and Christine “Crissie” Andrews Caughlin, Elizabeth “Betsy” was born in the ranch house next to the park in 1902. She was the youngest of four Caughlin children. Betsy recalled later in her life that she and her siblings used to look forward to riding in their horse-drawn buggy into Reno to go to the movies. She attended Reno High School, graduating in 1921. She studied art and married Roger Donnelly in 1936. Roger owned a roofing company in San Francisco, so the couple lived there for over 25 years. Upon retirement in the 1960s, the couple returned to Reno. At the death of her mother in 1955, Betsy and her siblings took over ownership and operation of the ranch which then totaled about 3,000 acres. Betsy passed away in 1999, after which the last of the Caughlin family’s ranch house possessions (furniture, antiques, paintings, and kitchenware) went up for sale. Image: Jill Richardson. Ranch House The beautiful ranch house next to the park belonged to the Caughlin family. Originally the family lived in a house on Mill Street, but they decided to move this lovely house down from Virginia City to their ranch. Many homes came to Reno after the bust of the Comstock and people moved out of Virginia City. The house was originally an orphanage, built between 1865 and 1867, and was moved to its current location around 1900 after the orphanage closed. In order to move homes such as this one, they were taken apart, transported on the Virginia and Truckee Railroad, and then reassembled at the new location. At the time Donnelly donated the land for the park in 1990, the house was not included because it was said to be uninhabitable. Donnelly’s great-nephew and his wife undertook a project to remodel the house in 1995. The floor plan of the house was kept largely the same over the years. The couple sold the house, along with the surrounding buildings, to the owners of a garden shop in 2009. As of 2021, five new office buildings around the house, called Mayberry Gardens. Image: Caughlin Ranch House; Source: Jill Richardson Reno Food Systems The field next to the ranch house, east of the park, is used as a vegetable farm for Reno Food Systems in a partnership with Washoe County Parks. According to their website, Reno Food Systems use this small demonstration farm to train future farmers. “Farm interns working on the property will receive hands-on experience growing high-density, organic crops in Northern Nevada's arid climate through natural and regenerative methods.” Washoe County has allowed Reno Food Systems to operate the 5-acre parcel. The group is a non-profit that promotes healthy communities through urban agriculture. Their mission is cultivating community-based food systems through education, research and civic engagement. They hope this project will encourage other small public parcels to be used as urban micro-farms. Image: Washoe County Parks website. Last Chance Ditch On the south side of the pasture along Plumb Lane is the Last Chance Ditch. Built in 1874, this was one of many ditches built in the Reno area. The name comes from the belief by its builders—George Andrews (grandfather of Betsy Caughlin Donnelly), Enoch Morrill, and Winslow P. Nay—to be their last opportunity to tap into the waters of the Truckee River. This ditch is 17-miles long and begins near Mogul and ends at Zolezzi Lane where it joins with White’s Creek. George Andrews sold his portion of the ditch (the first eight miles) to James Mayberry in 1877 with the provision that the Andrews Ranch (later the Caughlin Ranch) could access the water in perpetuity. Caughlin family history tells of George digging part of the ditch with pick and shovel and surveying the layout of the ditch. Over the many years, there were lawsuits over water rights to the ditch, but the Caughlin family prevailed. Image: Park Entrance; Source: Washoe County Parks website. Out of gallery Get Involved! Donate: Make a donation to support the Parks Project or your favorite Parks Foundation program, project, or wherever its needed! Click here to donate today. Volunteer: Support our parks by volunteering with the Parks Foundation! Attend a volunteer event or choose an ongoing role. Click here to explore opportunities. iNaturalist : Out in our parks or open spaces? Try cataloguing the biodiversity around you with iNaturalist! All it takes is downloading the iNaturalist app onto your phone to get started. ​ Curious what's been seen in this park? Click the link below to see what species other have spotted! Betsey Caughlin Donnelly Park on iNaturalist Contact: Have a question about our parks or the Parks Project? Email us at parksproject@tmparksfoundation.org ! Want To Learn More? References & Further Info: Washoe County Parks and Open Space - Betsy Caughlin Donnelly Park About Us . (n.d.). Retrieved March 29, 2021, from Reno Food Systems: 2021 Bremner, F. (1993, November 5). New park a place to gaze at the cattle grazing. Reno Gazette-Journal , p. 17. Cafferata, P. (2009, December 27). Water to fight over: The Last Chance Ditch. Reno Gazette-Journal , p. 44. Farley, C. (1990, October 24). Reno native donates southwest landd for park. Reno Gazette-Journal , p. 11. Farley, C. (1995, December 1). This old house. Reno Gazette-Journal , p. 53. Fine, L. (2005, December 2). Blast from the past. Reno Gazette-Journal , p. 89. Grady, S. (1998, September 11). Caughlin matriarch vividly remembers the 'working ranch'. Reno Gazette-Journal , p. 103. Last Chance Ditch case. (1935, February 2). Reno Evening Gazette , p. 12. Nickles, J. (1985, October 27). Second 'Donner Party' fights developers. Reno Gazette-Journal , p. 61. Park Farm . (n.d.). Retrieved March 29, 2021, from Reno Food Systems: https://www.renofoodsystems.org/parkfarm Skorupa, S. (2009, June 7). Garden Shop resettled on historic landscape. Reno Gazette-Journal , p. 41. Contributor(s): Jill Richardson (history) Haley McGuire Alex Shahbazi Last Updated: May 25, 2021, 5:34:15 PM Back to All Parks Biodiversity

  • Hilltop Park

    3950 Buckingham Square, Reno, NV 89503 Hilltop Park Park Description: Hilltop Park is a 5-acre Reno park with restrooms (opened seasonally: late April-early October weather permitting). Park Amenities: Playground, baseball/softball fields, picnic shelter, barbeque area, and tables/benches. Park Highlights 1/1 Park History Click the image to read each topic's full text! Want to help? Interested in researching the history of this park or another one in the Truckee Meadows? Follow the volunteering link in the "Get Involved!" section below to learn more! Out of gallery Get Involved! Donate: Make a donation to support the Parks Project or your favorite Parks Foundation program, project, or wherever its needed! Click here to donate today. Volunteer: Support our parks by volunteering with the Parks Foundation! Attend a volunteer event or choose an ongoing role. Click here to explore opportunities. iNaturalist : Out in our parks or open spaces? Try cataloguing the biodiversity around you with iNaturalist! All it takes is downloading the iNaturalist app onto your phone to get started. ​ Curious what's been seen in this park? Click the link below to see what species other have spotted! Hilltop Park on iNaturalist Contact: Have a question about our parks or the Parks Project? Email us at parksproject@tmparksfoundation.org ! Want To Learn More? References & Further Info: City of Reno Parks & Facilities Directory - Hilltop Park Contributor(s): Haley McGuire Alex Shahbazi Last Updated: April 20, 2021, 4:35:13 AM Back to All Parks Biodiversity

  • Grass Carp

    Grass Carp Scientific Name: Ctenopharyngodon idella Type: Fish Habitat: Lakes, ponds, and rivers Range: Native to eastern Asia, China, and Russia; introduced to the United States and have been reported in 45 states across the U.S. Status: Least Concern (IUCN Red List) This species is INVASIVE to the Truckee Meadows. Out of gallery Identification: Grass carp (also called the white amur) are a species of freshwater fish that has been introduced into many areas to serve as a control for aquatic weeds and plants. These carp are mostly silver and can be different shades of light green, white, or brass. The grass carp has a short face with a small mouth, and two rows of teeth. These fish can have a lifespan of 5 to 20 years depending on their environment and local predators. On average, a mature grass carp can weigh 10 to 20 pounds and grow several feet long, but some grass carp have been reported to be over 6 feet long and weigh nearly 100 pounds! Grass carp feed on a wide variety of underwater vegetation, making them ideal for weed control. Fast Facts: In some areas these fish are regulated and must be bred to be sterile (called triploid ). This makes them great for controlling underwater weeds because they cannot reproduce and negatively affect the ecosystem after their job is done. In other areas the grass carp have not been regulated or made to be sterile and can reproduce (called diploid ). They pose a threat overeating underwater vegetation and throwing the ecosystem out of balance. These fish can live anywhere where there is a consistent supply of freshwater plants to eat. In the wild, grass carp only spawn in moving water, where they let their eggs drift downstream with the current. Grass carp pose a problem to some areas. They eat too much vegetation, taking food and habitat away from other fish and making it easier for other plants to take over and grow out of balance. Grass carp also make water clarity worse in places where they have been introduced. Sources: Back to All Animals U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella var. diploid ), 2020, https://www.fws.gov/fisheries/ans/erss/highrisk/ERSS-Ctenopharyngodon-i della-final.pdf USDA, Grass Carp , 2021, https://www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov/aquatic/fish-and-other-vertebrates/gra ss-carp USGS, Nonindigenous Aquatic Species - Grass Carp, 2020, https://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/factsheet.aspx?SpeciesID=514 Image: Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee, https://www.flickr.com/photos/acrcc/37814721245 , license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ , cropped from original. Contributor(s): Kevin Livingstone (research & content) Alex Shahbazi (edits & page design) Last Updated: June 24, 2021, 11:51:02 PM

  • Hidden Valley Regional Park (Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation)

    Hidden Valley Regional Park History Biodiversity Submissions Volunteers Resources Directory MAP Hidden Valley Regional Park: Photo from the bluffs to the east of Hidden Valley Regional Park with the Carson Range in the distance and the park in the lower right. Source: Jill Richardson Since it opened in 1969, Hidden Valley Regional Park has been offering visitors plenty of ways for the entire family to recreate. Built on 480-acres deeded to Washoe County from the Bureau of Land Management, the park was envisioned to be “comparable to any in California or anywhere else in the United States” and it certainly has lived up to those expectations. Over the following decades, many additions and improvements were made to the park. A 40-acre grant from the BLM gave the park picnic sites, riding and hiking trails, and a small pond on the Boynton Slough with trees and grassy areas. In 1978, the county announced that it would develop ten acres with tennis courts, jogging paths, and picnic areas. Public input was solicited in 1990 for a group picnic area and horse arena. New playground equipment, lawn and picnic shelter were added in 2007. The following year, local philanthropist Link Piazzo donated a dog park. Benches shaded by trees were also included. Main Park Sign Image by Jay Kolbet-Clausell history Back to Top Submit Your Park Stories and Photos ! ​ Do you have personal photographs or stories about this park and are willing to share your memories with your community? Stories and photos can be recent adventures in the park, old memories of what the park used to be like, or fond remembrances of what this park has meant to you in the past. Sharing your photographs and memories will help to build our shared history of these important public places. Click here to upload your photos and/or stories! General Park Information : Hidden Valley Regional Park is a 480-acre Washoe County park with a restroom. Amenities Include : Playground, tennis/pickleball court, volleyball, multi-purpose trails (hiking, biking, horses), dog park (Link PIazzo Dog Park), horse arena (with announcer's stand), picnic areas (group area by permit/individual area non-reservable), horseshoes, and barbeque area. Here is a link to Hidden Valley Regional Park on Washoe County’s website. ​ To view Link PIazzo Dog Park video, click here ! biodiversity Back to Top Typical Flora and Fauna : The following are a few of our favorite highlights. See the community submission section below to view additional wildlife sightings found at this park, and submit you own favorite naturalist sightings through iNaturalist! Flora : Highlights: What plants have you seen here? Rabbitbrush Ephedra Mullein Desert Peach Gold Cobblestone Lichen Fauna : Highlights: What animals have you seen here? Western Fence Lizard Gopher Snake Side-Blotched Lizard Long-Nosed Leopard Lizard Red Tailed Hawk community submissions Back to Top Submission Box for Biodiversity Sightings: Click here to document your own biodiversity observations (pictures, video, or audio submissions accepted) of this park. Any observations noted along the Truckee River, please share with the Truckee River Guide here . Biodiversity Submissions: Submit Here iNaturalist Submissions : ... Community Stories and Photos: Your Name Hidden Valley Regional Park Tell us your stories about this park or share your photographs to add to the growing record of our shared park history! Your Name Hidden Valley Regional Park Tell us your stories about this park or share your photographs to add to the growing record of our shared park history! Your Name Hidden Valley Regional Park Tell us your stories about this park or share your photographs to add to the growing record of our shared park history! Please reload Submit Here! volunteer highlights Back to Top Hidden Valley Regional Park History Researcher Jill Richardson Jill is the History Researcher for this park. She has dedicated time to research and document the history of Hidden Valley Regional Park. Thank you Jill for your commitment to our parks and historic preservation! Volunteer Researcher : To learn more about volunteering for this Project, click here. Enjoy history? Then consider volunteering as a History Researcher today! ​ Like plants and animals? Then volunteer as our Biodiversity Researcher! Researchers Needed : Doggie Ambassador : To learn more about the Dog Waste Project, click here. Bret Hartman : Bret Hartman is the Doggie Waste Ambassador for this park. Thank you Bret for helping to keep Hidden Valley Regional Park free from dog waste and keep our parks clean! To learn more on how you can become a volunteer Doggie Waste Ambassador, click here. Hidden Valley: One Page Guide Hidden Valley: Discover Your Parks Video Washoe County: Hidden Valley Regional Park Hidden Valley: All Trails New to Reno: Hidden Valley Hidden Valley: Hiking Project Newspapers.com: Reno Gazette-Journal Newspapers.com: Nevada State Journal Full list of history sources here resources/more info Back to Top Donate Volunteer Top of Page